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Privacy Notice Students

Introduction

The college has a responsibility under data protection legislation to provide individuals with information about how we process their personal data. We are committed to holding and processing personal information fairly and lawfully. This privacy notice should be read in conjunction with the college's Data Protection Policy. We as a college collect and process personal data relating to our students to manage the collegestudent relationship. We are committed to being transparent about how we collect and use such data and to meeting our data protection obligations. The contents of this privacy notice apply, as applicable, to current and former students and, in some cases, prospective students. If you have any questions or concerns about the way in which we are processing your personal data, please contact the Executive Director (execdirector@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk).  

Collection of personal data

Personal data are normally initially provided to the college by a prospective student on an undergraduate or postgraduate application form. For successful applicants, we will add further data at registration and in the course of the student’s studies as required for the proper fulfilment of our responsibilities. After graduation or termination of studies, some data are passed to maintain our alumni database for approved purposes; other records are retained and disposed of in line with our Records Retention Schedule. The personal data of unsuccessful applicants are also retained and disposed of in line with our Records Retention Schedule. We hold special category data (e.g. ethnicity, physical or mental health or disability) for the provision of student support services to individuals and for equal opportunities monitoring and statutory reporting. Information on a student's health or disability may be required prior to admission, for purposes linked with academic progress or the provision of accommodation. We may also require information on a student’s health when a student undertakes placement work, such as for health and safety or insurance purposes. Further information may also be required if the student seeks work with the college in a paid or unpaid capacity.  

Lawful basis

We process your data prior to, during and for a period after your programme of study under the basis of a contract with you. We offer student support services, in the interests of academic progression and participation in college life. We are required to demonstrate our support for students with disabilities, and for this we need to request and hold special category data and medical evidence, which we process under our legal obligations to the Equality Act 2010. At the point of being asked to disclose special category data you will be given further details on how this information will be processed. Our Learning Advisor has specific agreements outlining how special category data will be processed. We may additionally enter into a contract with you regarding residence at one of our properties. The College processes data to ensure that it is complying with our legal obligations, for example in respect of Council Tax, Home Office requirements regarding visas and obligations under the Equality Act 2010. We may also use your personal information where we need to protect your (or someone else’s) interests or where it is in the public interest. When we process your personal information we will do so provided your fundamental rights do not override those interests.  

Storage of personal data

Student data are held in the student management system (the Directory), in the alumni relations system (Association database), and the virtual learning environment (Moodle). Access to each system is limited to approved college staff members. Student data are also held locally by college academic staff and professional support services in email, network storage and paper files. Core details of each student are transferred to the college's archives for permanent preservation.  

Processing of personal data

We process data to:
  1. administer study, such as recording of achievements, determination of award and monitoring of attendance;
  2. provide student support services, such as counselling or services for students with disabilities or learning difficulties;
  3. provide facilities, such as the IT service and Library service;
  4. contact students electronically;
  5. administer finance, such as payment of fees;
  6. administer tenancies or licence agreements of college-managed properties;
  7. monitor equal opportunities;
  8. prevent and detect crime, such as using CCTV or attaching photos to ID cards;
  9. ensure compliance with our acceptable use policy of networked systems;
  10. maintain contact with alumni;
  11. raise funds and promote marketing initiatives;
  12. process student academic appeals and student discipline cases;
  13. inform students of activities and events;
  14. host mailing of services of direct relevance to student interests; and
  15. facilitate communication with churches and other organisations concerning opportunities for ministry and service.
 

Sharing of data

Personal data are shared with our validating universities in so far as it is necessary for us and them to complete all the requirements of our validation agreements. In order to fulfil our responsibilities to students' sponsoring organisations, data, including progress reports, will also be shared with them, including, for ordinands or prospective ordinands, with the Ministry Division of the Church of England and the dioceses from or to which they are sent. Data may be shared with our partner college, Bristol Baptist College, where it is required for us to fulfil an obligation related to our students' courses of study, for example class lists for classes undertaken at the Baptist College or retreat days organised by Baptist colleagues. We may need to disclose students’ personal data to organisations contracted to work on our behalf, which could include our insurers or legal consultants. In certain and extreme circumstances we may pass the personal data of student debtors to an external debt collection agency if the we have been unable to recover the debt by normal internal processes. We may also disclose data to auditors undertaking investigations, selected individuals acting on our behalf such as former students or staff organising alumni events, external organisations undertaking market research or academic researchers, provided no personal data are published. During the course of student support, data may be shared with external agencies, for example for medical or counselling support. Students will be asked for consent to share any data with an external agency if the purpose is to secure non-urgent but specialist student support. If there is an urgent need for specialist medical help, we will seek consent to share any data, but where consent cannot or will not be given we might act without consent. We may, in order to protect the vital interests of the student or another person, contact third parties, such as medical professionals or next of kin, concerning the health of a student when we believe it is reasonable and/or in the best interests of the student to do so. We will attempt to gain the prior consent from the student to do so but where consent cannot or will not be given we might act without consent. We will share your information where legally obliged to, for example with law enforcement agencies, and may not be able to inform you of the sharing, for example where this may compromise any investigation. We are legally obliged to provide student personal data to Council Tax Registration Officers and, where applicable, to the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI). We have a statutory requirement to disclose student personal data to the following and/or their nominees/successors: Office for Students (OfS); the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA); the Learning and Skills Council; the Quality Assurance Agency; the Department for Education; the Student Loans Company and Electoral Registration Officers. The purposes for which data are collected by HESA can be found in the HESA Student Collection Notice which is reviewed annually and any amendments to the current version will be available at https://www.hesa.ac.uk/about/regulation/data-protection/noticesalong with links to earlier versions.HESA takes precautions to ensure that individuals are not identified from the anonymised data which they process. Students have the right to a copy of the information HESA holds about them. You should make requests directly to HESA by emailing data.protection@hesa.ac.uk. If you have concerns about your information being used for the stated purposes you should contact HESA directly. Where we participate in higher education or student surveys, such as the Graduate Outcome Survey or the National Student Survey, you will receive further privacy or data protection information if you are contacted for these surveys We will provide data about students on the Tier 4 Student Visa to the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) in order to fulfil our duties as an approved sponsor on international students. We may process a student’s personal data for the purpose of the prevention and detection of fraud, particularly plagiarism (this may involve disclosure to third parties e.g. in the use of plagiarism detection software). We may also process a student’s personal data in the course of disciplinary procedures or academic appeals (this may involve disclosure to third parties e.g. to seek legal advice). Where a student’s course of study requires study or a placement at a church or another organisation it will be necessary for us to transfer personal data to the external organisation, whether this is within the UK or abroad. Students should be aware that some countries outside of the EEA have lower standards for the protection of personal data than those within the EEA. Students are required to provide a digital image of themselves for reproduction on their identification card, which is also used for library purpose. The digital image may also be used on college lists or notice boards that may be displayed within the college and attached to electronic student records that can be viewed by members of staff. We may commission photography on campus or at specific events, such as the welcome service, for use in our promotional material. Students may appear on the resulting images, and the resulting images may be published. We are required to obtain information about past criminal convictions prior to offering a place on some of our programmes and as a condition of employment for certain posts. We also undertake Disclosure and Barring Service checks on those students who work with young and/or vulnerable people.  

Retention of personal data

Student data are kept, deleted or archived in accordance with our record retention schedule.  

Website

When someone visits www.trinitycollegebristol.ac.ukwe do not currently collect standard internet log information and details of visitor behaviour patterns. Our website does not use cookies for general users, only website administrators. This privacy notice does not cover the links within our website linking to other websites. We encourage you to read the privacy statements on the other websites you visit.  

Changes to policy and practice

We regularly review our privacy information to ensure that it remains accurate and current. We will review and update this privacy information whenever we plan to use personal data for any new purpose. Any changes to this privacy information will be communicated to you.  

Further information

If you have any questions which you feel have not been covered by this Privacy Notice, please email execdirector@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.

Forms for 2019 new DL students to complete

We're looking forward to welcoming you to Trinity! Thanks in advance for taking the time to download and complete these forms; if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Alison Branston at admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk. Student information form 2019 > Music form >  

Prospective Students

Alumni, Friends & Dioceses

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Student Pastoral and Wellness Team

Forms for new 2019 part-time students to complete

We're looking forward to welcoming you to Trinity! Thanks in advance for taking the time to download and complete this form; if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Jo Norman at jo.norman@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.   New student information form >    

Our Chaplains

Postgraduate Research Conference

Each year, at the end of June, we welcome our postgraduate students from around the world to come join us in Bristol, staying at Trinity for our annual postgraduate research conference. The conference includes three days of paper presentations from students, seminars (topics have included improving your academic writing, publishing your work, and life after completing the PhD), a keynote lecture from a senior scholar, evenings out together, and the options at the end of the conference to participate in a Saturday sightseeing trip and a Sunday barbecue. Read about our 2019 conference with Rev Dr Lissa Wray Beal > Read about our 2018 conference with Prof Katherine Sonderegger > Read about our 2017 conference with Prof NT Wright > Read about our 2016 conference with Rev Dr Walter Moberly > Read about our 2015 conference with Prof John Webster >

Watch our videos

 

What is 'Gathered Learning' at Trinity?

How might it change you, as a person and as a Christian leader, to learn more about Jesus in the context of an intentional community? Find out more about what it might look like to prepare 'residentially' for ordination or Christian leadership through Trinity. (1:56)  

What is 'Dispersed Learning' at Trinity?

Train for ordination in the Church of England by coming to Bristol for six block weeks a year, remaining embedded in your local context, and participating in weekly virtual seminars and pastoral groups with your cohort. (2:31)  

Postgraduate research at Trinity

Join our community of doctoral students from around the world in a programme accredited by the University of Aberdeen. Our students participate in online research seminars, a summer conference in Bristol, opportunities to interact with top scholars in theology and the Bible--all in the context of a theological training college committed to serve the church and the kingdom of God.   To request a prospectus, arrange a visit, or ask questions about how what we offer might best fit your needs and circumstance, contact our admissions team: admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254. To find out more about postgraduate research contact pavla.slugenova@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.        

Our history

On 1st January 1972 Stoke House opened its doors for the first time under the newly formed Trinity College which was a merging of three Bristol theological colleges: Clifton Theological College which first used the building for theological education in 1932, Tyndale Hall and the women's college Dalton House. Pictured below are the students and staff of the newly formed Trinity College in 1972. In the front row (middle) is Trinity's first principal, Alec Motyer, with Associate Principal JI Packer to his left, Dean of Women Joyce Baldwin to his right, and Dean Gervais Angel to Joyce's right. [gallery size="full" columns="1" link="file" ids="7206"] Our history is a colourful one, and we acknowledge that the forming of Trinity could have been handled better as Colin Buchanan’s upcoming book will explore but we rejoice in how God has used us all. It is a remarkable legacy that has been laid. As a community, it’s exciting to think of the future ahead as we consider all that God has done through all who have been involved with Trinity be they students, ordinands, staff or Faculty.  In doing so, it’s easy to reflect how our current cohort benefits from the rich experience of our alumni but it’s also worth acknowledging that while our history is young, so are some of our current students with a good portion of them having not been born when Trinity started.    The Grounds Trinity is located on a nine-acre site in northwest Bristol in the United Kingdom. The college's main building, Stoke House, was completed in 1669 for British merchant, Bristol mayor, and Member of Parliament Sir Robert Cann. Pictured below is a view of Stoke House painted by Joseph Mallord William Turner in 1791 of himself and three friends on the lawn. [gallery columns="1" link="file" size="large" ids="7215"] Over time, Stoke House's former orangery became the college chapel. The ballroom, an extension to the original house, became the library. Modern additions to the grounds include the Carter building for single and commuter students, the Clifton building with studies and smaller lecture rooms, the student common room, the dining room, the main lecture rooms, our day nursery, and Henry Martyn House, which is equipped for virtual seminars as well as guest accommodation. Trinity offers on-site accommodation for single students and college flats and houses off-site for couples and families. We also offer guest rooms for visitors. We are currently looking forward to continuing the consultation for the site development project which looks to build new on-site accommodation for single ordinands while making the best use of the assets we already have. 

Our Vision

We want Christ's kingdom values to permeate every area of our lives, affecting how we live and work each day, how we learn more of God, and how we lead his people. Our students partake in a warm, vibrant community, which includes support for student spouses, an Ofsted-registered day nursery, and regular times for prayer, Eucharist, and meals together. You can read more about our vision and values here.

We offer undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate study options, including a certificate, diploma, BA (Hons), graduate diploma, postgraduate diploma, MA, and PhD accredited through Durham University and Aberdeen University. You can read more about our programmes here.

Our Mission has and continues to be for kingdom living, kingdom learning and kingdom leading. Our task is shaping leaders of Christ-like character in community for a missional church.

Growth in dispersed learning

This autumn our dispersed learning (non-residential) student cohorts have grown from six students last academic year to seventeen this year. Our dispersed learners remain in their context and come into college throughout the year for block weeks, while connecting weekly through virtual pastoral groups. Trinity provides added support for the students' context supervisors to ensure connections between the students' work in context and their academic studies. Tutor in Worship and Church History Rev Dr Paul Roberts has now joined Director of Mixed-Mode Training Rev Sue Gent in leading a second pastoral group for dispersed learners. 'I am delighted that the cohort has grown this year and am loving working with the dispersed learning students from both years,' says Sue. 'They have embraced integrating their learning in college and context with enthusiasm and are forming deep lifelong friendships at college and in context that will sustain them in ministry.'   Posted September 2019

Year-round contextual engagement

You may already be working for a church and want to stay, or you might be keen to look for a new church to form the context for this time of training. We will work with you to make sure that you have a supportive environment and good supervision from an experienced church leader, and you will meet with him or her (as well as with your Trinity tutor group tutor) for regular supervision.

Your church placement is important not just for the hands-on leadership experience it gives you, but because it forms the context for your assessed learning. You can use your placement experience very intentionally in order to gain particular experiences you’ve not yet had in ministry; you can also gain the experience of serving in a church environment different from the type of church from which you’ve come. You choose your church context in conversation with Trinity tutors in consultation with your diocese to determine what will best fit you, given your past experiences and your future calling.

Your practical experiences of ministry will inform your academic assignments for classes on topics such as leadership, worship, mission and pastoral theology, and vice versa – your placement church is the environment in which you’ll have the opportunity to put into practice what you’re learning in the classroom. Your learning in your placement will be supported by an opportunity to connect with your peers and tutors simply by logging in to a virtual classroom each week.

Summer church placement

At the end of your first year of training you’ll have the opportunity to work alongside a church leadership team full-time for four weeks. Whether it’s leading Sunday services or conducting pastoral visits, or helping with church meetings and running children’s holiday clubs, you’ll be immersed in the day-to-day running of the church. To make sure you’re experiencing a breadth of ministry contexts and opportunities, we aim to place you in a different church than the one you’re a part of regularly. It’s usually somewhere local to you, although it doesn’t have to be. We hope this will be a good chance for you to be challenged and grown through a new and possibly very different experience of church life, ministry and leadership.

Financial support

 

Usually your placement church will cover the majority of those costs, either by way of a grant or by paying you a salary for the work you do with them, and the rest of your costs might then be covered by a diocesan grant or other grant available from Ministry Division.

You can get in touch with our admissions team, and they’ll be happy to talk with you about the financial implications of your training.

Complete a Student Application

[contact-form-7 id="2354" title="New Application"]

Times of worship

eucharist-croppedWe begin each day with the opportunity to worship and pray together in our morning chapel services, from 8.30-9am. This serves as both a sacred act of worship and a formational time of learning: groups of students take it in turn to plan and run the services, so that everyone has a chance across the year to both lead and be led. We also have weekly Communion services, into which a more extended time of teaching is incorporated. Our services often take the form of Common Worship, but we also make use of other traditions and styles of worship from the simple expressions of the Iona and Taize communities to the weighty liturgy of the Book of Common Prayer. We also have several Creative Weeks, where the innovation of the community is given free reign, and it’s both a privilege and a learning opportunity to be able to worship God in such diverse ways.

Student Application Submission

Prospective students can use this online submissions system to:
  • Submit all your application details securely online and view your completed application form.
  • We are currently experiencing (and working to address) a technical problem with saved applications. Please do not use the save button. Before you begin your application, review on the form the information you will need to have ready, then plan to have those resources with you so that you can complete and submit the application in one sitting.
If you are unable to make an online application, please email admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk. Start new application Complete an existing application

Quiet times and personal reflection

As a whole community we engage with a weekly spiritual formation programme, consisting of a 50-minute session on a key topic relating to Christian discipleship followed by an hour of silence, meant for personal contemplation and prayer. These sessions help you learn more about spiritual disciplines and traditions in the church and to engage in different forms of prayer and the rule of life. We also lead three quiet days a year, each involving different opportunities for personal and corporate reflection, prayer and spiritual growth. (Read more about a sample retreat day.) Annually, students are also offered an option to visit the Franciscan community at Hilfield Priory.

Tutor groups and prayer triplets

You will meet weekly for formation in a tutor group of about 8-10 people, often the students with whom you serve in your context church, and a college tutor. The groups meet for two hours every Wednesday, dividing their time between worship and prayer, theological reflections, serving the wider community in practical ways, and building friendships together. Prayer triplets are a key part of our community life, helping provide personal support, encouragement, and accountability for each student. These relationships often continue to provide valuable support well beyond your time at Trinity.

Trinity's COVID-19 update (Nov 2020)

What's been happening at Trinity through the autumn term? What will a second lockdown in England look like at college?   [Read our current risk assessment]   In developing our COVID response, Trinity has remained committed to the importance of learning in community and maintaining our physical community as much as we can whilst following safety precautions and government regulations. In early September, Trinity reopened for Welcome Week and classes, with new safety measures in place. We installed a temporary marquee on the lawn in advance of Welcome Week, with sides that could be rolled up to provide an open-air space regardless of weather, to make space for socially distanced student gatherings. In September and October, lectures met in person, with tutors teaching behind Perspex sheets to socially distanced students. All lectures have been made available virtually through Zoom for those who are shielding or isolating. The college is operating a one-way system to minimise traffic in the corridors. Students have met together as tutor groups in larger rooms that allow for distancing, rather than in tutor studies. While we cannot currently gather all together for lunch, students and staff have been pre-ordering lunches that are collected and distributed by tutor groups through tiffin tins. These are washed and returned to the dining room for re-use. The tiffin tin system has enabled us to maintain the quality of our food as a way of communicating love and care for those within our community. We have creatively met for Morning Prayer together, with only the tutor group leading worship and two other tutor groups physically present in the chapel to enable social distancing, the rest of the tutor groups watching a livestream in the dining room, and those unable to be physically present at college participating through a livestream on Trinity’s YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/trinity-college-bristol). Our Student Exec have also planned creative ways in which students could socialise within the guidelines, including pub trips in groups of six, organising walks in groups of six, online games, and students could book a spot to attend an ‘Autumn Evening,’ with outdoor bonfire gatherings at college. ‘It was a great relief to many students when we learnt that Trinity was putting in measures to keep us safe, while also enabling in-person study,’ says Student Exec President Claire Welch. ‘For many students, the community is one of the key attractions to studying at Trinity. It has been encouraging to see how well everybody has adapted to the changes and relationships begin to form across the year groups. We really appreciate the effort the faculty have made to offer a blended approach (in-person and virtual) to access lectures. This gives students choice to access classes in a way that suits their situation.’ During this month-long second lockdown in England, our community will temporarily attend lectures and meet for tutor groups through Zoom, though students will still have access to their studies and the library. We will continue to participate in chapel together in the mornings through livestreams on YouTube. Our tutors and Trinity’s chaplains will be available to students who could use added support during a second lockdown. To socialise together as a community, we will be hosting weekly online coffee breaks on Tuesdays and Fridays. We are also looking forward to welcoming prospective students to our online Open Day this Saturday, 7 November! If you are a current student with questions, please contact sophie.davis@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk. If you are a prospective student with questions, please contact admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.   Posted 4 November 2020

Four facts about our postgrad programme that might surprise you

New technology, new opportunities, and a growing community of scholars who hope their research will impact the church.

Pioneering at Trinity

Are you an Ordained Pioneer Minister (OPM) or someone looking to explore pioneering?

The church needs pioneers who will forge new and creative approaches to sharing the gospel as well as those who can do pioneering work within the church. We want to create a healthy environment for pioneers and those with a pioneering mindset to flourish, as you discern how God may be leading you.

 

 

1. We recognise the unique needs of pioneers. As you'll often be working outside normal support systems and structures, it is critical that you are well prepared.

  • We offer a strong foundation of Bible and theology on which to build your current and future projects. 
  • You have the option to train within our residential community (train within an intentional community whilst living in the Bristol area or on-site if you are a single or commuter student) or through our non-residential dispersed learning (DL) track (come into college for six block weeks a year while remaining in your current context).
  • Connect regularly with pioneer practitioners through ‘input classes,’ which are half-termly meetings, timed to coordinate with our dispersed learners’ block weeks. Hear a seminar from an external speaker and engage together for a question-and-answer time.
  • Connect regularly with fellow pioneers through fortnightly small group lunchtime meetings to discuss, debate, and reflect on a curriculum intended to lead you from thinking about what pioneering can be to a more refined idea of your own calling as a pioneer.
  • Our pioneer programme is led by our Tutor in Missiology, our Associate Pioneer Missioner, and by a current Trinity student who serves as Pioneer Student Rep. Our Associate Pioneer Missioner, alumnus Revd John White (Trinity 2018), has been spending time coaching those interested in becoming pioneers, offering practical help as well as help in discernment. John is currently involved in a pioneer initiative in Bristol, Hazelnut Community Farm, which seeks to combine the community of a city farm, learning together to care for the planet, and the spiritual life of the local church. 
  • You can decide to complete your context placement in a pioneer context. 

2. Pioneer modules within the undergraduate programme include:

  • Mission Entrepreneurship: Principles—encourages you to relate social entrepreneurship to mission and introduces you to the principles, history, and practice of entrepreneurship through its study in the social sector.
  • Elements of Ministry and Mission in Context—introduces you to key terms and themes relating to Christian ministry and mission in the church tradition / vocational context for and within which you are being prepared.
  • ILCP B for Creative Communication—encourages you to integrate your current learning with your preferred style of communication.
  • Mission and Apologetics in Contemporary Culture—enables you to analyse cultures and subcultures, to think missionally about the relationship between the gospel and contemporary Western cultures. Equips you with the apologetic skills needed to engage with people in contemporary cultures and enables you to develop appropriate strategies for missionary engagement with contemporary cultures.
  • You will also be offered assessment options within some of your classes with a pioneering focus.

3. Modules within the MA course include:

  • Reflective Practice: Mission and Evangelism—supports students in their ministerial development by engaging with the forms of theological reflection that underpin reflective practice in a ministerial / professional / vocational context.
  • A dissertation module (either undergraduate or postgraduate) which could be focused around a theological exploration of particular aspects of pioneer ministry.

 

For more information about training as a pioneer at Trinity College Bristol, call or email our admissions office: admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254. Read more about some of our recent pioneers here.

Home

Writing a Research Proposal for Postgraduate Study (MTh and PhD)

A good research proposal should not merely articulate a general topic of interest, but rather demonstrate a candidate’s ability to conceive their research in terms of a viable project. Your proposal should therefore include the following elements:

  • A clear description of the proposed thesis topic, indicating the precise research question you will investigate over the course of your work.
  • An account of how the proposed topic fits into the existing field.
  • A description of the methodology to be used to pursue the research question (e.g., study of written sources, social surveys, fieldwork, etc.).
  • An account of why Trinity College is suited to the proposed research.
  • A brief, provisional outline of the thesis.
  • A representative bibliography of the types of sources you plan to consult in the course of your research.

Proposals should be no longer than 1500 words, not counting the representative bibliography, and your name ought to appear in the upper right hand corner of each page of the document. The proposal should be submitted with your application alongside other supporting documents.

Accepted candidates will not necessarily be bound by the proposal that accompanied their application. Its purpose is to reveal something of the applicant’s preparation and insight. During the first months of work, research students often adjust their proposals in consultation with their supervisors.

Forms for new 2022 students to complete

We're looking forward to welcoming you to Trinity! Thanks in advance for taking the time to download and complete these forms; if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Naomi Baker (naomi.baker@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk). GATHERED LEARNERS GL Student Information Form 2022 > GL Music Form 2022 > College Jobs And Buddies Form 2022 DISPERSED LEARNERS DL Student Information Form 2022 > DL Music Form 2022> PART-TIME LEARNERS Part-time Student Information Form 2022 >

Dispersed Learning

Through our dispersed learning track, you can live a distance from the college and still benefit from studying at Trinity without moving home. Our dispersed learners can complete the Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission in two years or the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Theology, Ministry and Mission in three years, both accredited by Durham University. Dispersed learning students attend college for six block weeks during the academic year. These include a welcome week with some teaching in September and four other teaching block weeks. The sixth block week in May is a retreat/formation week. Block weeks commence at lunchtime on Monday and end at lunchtime on Friday to give time for travel from a distance. There is some time dedicated to reflection during the block weeks, and we are also intentional about building community within our dispersed learning cohort and facilitating worship and engagement with the wider community. During the weeks between block weeks, students log into a weekly virtual tutor group and seminar (pictured below), using our excellent ‘lifesize’ video conferencing facility or other virtual means to connect the cohort and tutors, offering additional support for learning in context and formation. Students who are local may choose to attend these sessions in person. Close integration between your context and the college is a priority, building on Trinity's expertise in contextual training. We regularly visit our dispersed learners in their context and closely liaise with their context supervisors. The college offers support and training to supervisors to facilitate your engagement in context, and supervisors are aware of your academic modules and assignments in order to help you integrate theory and practice in supervision sessions. Such integration will also be a strong theme of the seminars at college, as our tutors ensure that you relate your studies to your ministry. Students benefit from access to a faculty member dedicated to the oversight and development of this form of training. The balance of context engagement and study is designed to facilitate a high quality rigorous academic programme integrated with contextual engagement. This is organised as
  • Two-and-a-half days in personal study a week, plus half a day spent in seminars and with your tutor group, accessed either in college or virtually.
  • Two days plus Sundays in context inclusive of supervision time with your church supervisor. Clear expectations are given to supervisors in relation to your engagement in context.
  • You have one day a week for rest from the programme.
Are you a pioneer? Find out more about our pioneer cohort, which includes both residential and non-residential/dispersed students. For further information about dispersed learning or questions regarding admissions contact admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254.

Welcome to our New Wine family

With the recent news of Trinity alumni, Denis Adide joining the New Wine leadership team, we are particularly excited to see how God will bless this appointment and we are also looking forward to hopefully meeting you in person at NW events or on one of our open days.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z41e_LP697M Within our community, we seek to provide an integrated educational experience. As you learn from the Bible and interact with our faculty, as you engage in church and other placements alongside fellow students and a mentoring church leader, as you practise spiritual disciplines together with the rest of the community—you will grow as a whole person seeking to follow Jesus and bear witness to his coming kingdom as a missional leader. We will not prioritise your academic experience over your context learning, or your context learning over your lectures. We blend challenging study and context experiences together for holistic growth. What we gain by studying in community together is a deeper engagement in every area. Lecture discussions spill out into coffee times. Your tutors aren’t only in your lectures but are eating lunch with you, meeting in smaller groups with you, as well as regularly available for appointments. The students in your tutor group will serve alongside you in context church placements, and you'll discuss your questions, ideas, and experiences. We spend enough time together to become more like family than fellow students and to practice living Christ’s Beatitudes together. We learn together how to discuss ideas with respect despite disagreement, how to offer confession and forgiveness to one another when needed, how to grow in unity and our ability to love as Christ loves. When you have moments of struggling or feeling discouraged, our community of tutors, students, as well as our chaplains and staff will be there to offer support for you and your family. We are on this journey together at Trinity—and what we build here with one another is carried on after college as a supportive network of relationships. At Trinity you also gain faculty and staff members who invest in each student individually. We will look at your background and situation and take time to consider the ways in which your time at Trinity could be best constructed to help you grow as a Christian leader. In discussion with you, we will connect you with a context church experience designed to stretch you. We will make sure your classes fit with what you most need to learn academically. If you are pregnant or have recently had a baby, we will work with you around due dates and to figure out with you how to train while juggling the baby’s feedings and care.

Taking the step to move in order to train can feel daunting at moments, but if God is calling you to take that step of faith, he will also provide you and your family with what you need to follow him.

ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES

  To help you learn more about us in advance, below are links to a series of short videos we created during last spring’s lockdown for prospective students, including a college tour made by a group of our students who spent the lockdown together on-site.
  1. Learn more about Trinity’s vision and values (with Principal Revd Dr Sean Doherty, 15:57 minutes) >
  2. Watch a video about studying within our residential ’gathered’ Bristol community (1:56 minutes) >
  3. Watch a video about studying through our non-residential ’dispersed learning’ programme (2:30 minutes) >
  4. What academic programmes and context experiences do we offer? (with Revd Dr Helen Collins, 9:13 minutes) >
  5. What will the shape of your week look like as a Trinity student? (with Revd Dr Sean Doherty) >
  6. Take a college tour, hosted by our students who’ve remained in on-site accommodation together during lockdown (4:55 minutes) >
  7. Load a PDF of the kingdom values to which you commit when you join our community >

Forms for new 2021 students to complete

We're looking forward to welcoming you to Trinity! Thanks in advance for taking the time to download and complete these forms; if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Alison Branston at admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk. GATHERED LEARNERS GL Student Information Form 2021 > GL Music Form 2021 > College Jobs And Buddies Form 2021 DISPERSED LEARNERS DL Student Information Form 2021 > DL Music Form 2021 > PART-TIME LEARNERS Part-time Student Information Form 2020 >

Study at Trinity

At Trinity, our passion is to see people embrace the call to ‘Live like the kingdom is near’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y25PbxR1k4U

Our community life is central to everything we do here whether our students are full-time or part-time or, gathered or dispersed. We offer a variety of programmes that are all deeply based on our vision and values. 

From this page, you can find information about our different modes of study: Additional helpful information:

Apply now >

Connect: Who we are

Primarily, Connect is a community of people, and our purpose is threefold:
  • To provide opportunities for fellowship for partners of those in full-time study at Trinity College.
  • To provide support to one another, sharing our lives together and seeking God’s transformation in our lives.
  • To be a means by which our members can be equipped for their future ministry, and develop their own unique callings.
Our heart is to be a place where God can prepare us for life after Trinity.

How is Connect run?

Connect can only operate with the help of all its members (not just the exec)! There will be many opportunities to get involved in the running of Connect over the coming year with a range of tasks. This may be setting up a room for a meeting, giving someone a lift to an event, baking a cake, bringing snacks for children, helping organise a social, tidying up at the end of a meeting, running a children’s activity, helping to plan our programme of talks each term, helping to run a home group, leading worship, helping with prayers…the list goes on! There will be something for everyone so we look forward to you getting involved! We have found in the past that the more you put into Connect, the more you get out of it.

What is a Pioneer?

Why the church needs pioneer ministers, and how Trinity hopes to help prepare them. After the birth of her daughter, Sonya Newton decided it was time for a fresh start in her life, for a return to church. After several painful and tumultuous years away, she walked into a church near the estate where she'd been placed as a single parent and sat down in the back, keeping to the edges. But the older women in the church loved and fussed over her baby, and that helped her to continue to come each Sunday. As she connected with other mums around the estate, Sonya found herself leading a growing Alpha group in her home with women who also preferred to keep the edges, and who, despite their interest, were unlikely to step inside a church. As she met and married her husband, Richard, the couple had three boys in three years, and moved to Gloucester. Once again Sonya found herself connecting with mums on the fringes as she began to lead a mums' group at a local church. 'The mums were all looking so tired. They needed looking after! I added a God talk in—a Bible verse and a chat about it.' When she dropped her oldest son at a nearby children's centre, she began inviting and walking mums up from the children's centre to the mums' group. Soon fifteen mums were regularly attending, and Sonya obtained permission from the PCC to move the mums' group to a new location at a rugby club just outside the school gates. 'I had a collar on in my head when I was confirmed at 14,' Sonya says. 'But this wasn't how I was brought up. I was brought up that you grew up and got a good job, and that job would probably be in a factory. “Vicar” was not on the list, so that idea was terrifying.' Even as Sonya fought against the idea of becoming a vicar, her husband shared the book Personality of a Pioneer with her, and something clicked. 'This was a helpful term for me,' Sonya says. 'I'm a priest, a pioneer. I used to think I'd have to be a vicar according to my preconceived ideas of a vicar, but it's not something I've got to put on. It's something that will come out of me.'

What is a 'pioneer'?

The Church of England currently defines 'pioneers' as 'people called by God who are the first to see and respond to the Holy Spirit's initiatives with those outside the church within a particular context, around which others will gather with them and together establish new Christian community.' Some pioneers may be church based, working within the parish system to pioneer within an established church base, and others may be 'fresh start' pioneers, who work closely connected with a diocese but outside the conventional parish system in areas or networks with no present church connection. According to Rev Canon Dave Male, the national advisor for pioneer development in the Church of England's Ministry Division, 'Our research has shown that in just over a decade, 15 percent of diocesan church communities are now fresh expressions of church, and 60 percent of those attending fresh expressions churches are people outside the present church. Eighty percent of these new communities are taking steps to grow disciples. There is an overwhelming necessity for the Church to grasp at this moment that pioneers and pioneering are vital in leading us to the future of the Church of England's mission; they enable us to connect with the majority of the population and re-evangelise England.' To further enhance the training of our pioneer ordinands, Trinity is now offering a Pioneer Focus, for those students who have been approved as ordained pioneer ministers, or who will be serving in a pioneering curacy.

Trinity's first pioneer cohort

The first pioneer cohort, which is facilitated by mission tutor Rev Dr Howard Worsley, currently includes eight pioneering ordinands—both residential and full-time nonresidential students. It meets twice each half-term, providing opportunities for students to engage with guest practitioners and share experiences and ideas with one another while engaging in pioneer opportunities within their placements. Students are also encouraged through the group’s conversations to reflect on how what they are learning in classes will impact their pioneer ministries, and within classes are offered assessment options with a pioneering focus. Ordinand Michelle Taylor, who is preparing for a pioneer curacy in Bath and Wells Diocese, says the new cohort is ‘really exciting–what I’m hoping for is to get to hear other people’s stories, to bounce ideas off each other.’ Michelle had worked for three years in a church plant in Portishead, while questioning and re-evaluating what God wanted her to do. After receiving unsought affirmation of her call from an Anglican vicar and several months spent on retreat seeking God, Michelle became Anglican and began the discernment process. When she received a pioneer curacy offer from her diocese, Michelle says, 'For the first time, it felt like someone was saying “She can do that—let her do that.”' In her curacy, Michelle will be meeting in a primary school and in small home groups to grow community. 'I thrive on change,' she says. 'You have to be willing to take a risk. You don't know till you've tried it.'

Learning together rather than alone

As the students in the new Pioneer Focus cohort hear one another's stories and experiences, they realise what a diverse group they are. Some students have already initiated several ministries and others are just beginning. Some move quickly from one project to the next, launching a new ministry and then leaving it in others' hands, while others explore their ideas for what could be done, within and outside of the walls of a church. Pioneering ordinand Lucy Howarth had thought at 21 that she would be too young to be considered a pioneer minister. As part of the application process with her diocese, she had to put together a portfolio of what she'd done, which included a student street ministry outside a nightclub in Newcastle and a group for young adults who'd become disengaged with church but who shared an interest in climbing and outdoor activities. 'You can do Sunday church well, but I think the difference with pioneering is that you meet people where they are and ask, “How can I bring God into this? How can I turn this into church?”' Because pioneers naturally follow God into new and unlikely situations—one pioneering student recently helped organise a metal mass service that hosted one hundred people in the Bristol city centre—and because pioneers often find that they themselves do not 'fit' within established contexts, they may feel alone on their journeys. 'Pioneers are naturally isolated,' says pioneering ordinand John White. 'If we can support each other and keep each other grounded, that's huge.' Midway through his first year of ordination training at Trinity, John heard Dave Male speak at Trinity about pioneer ministry, which in turn began John on a process of applying to his diocese to become a pioneer minister. 'I want to be a bridge between the church and those outside the church. We should influence each other—the pioneer should do new things and impact the church, and the church should support and root the pioneer minister.'

Growing strong biblical roots

While the new pioneer cohort discusses the challenges unique to pioneer ministries, pioneering students also need a strong understanding of the Bible, theology, and the church. As they often work outside normal support systems and structures, it is perhaps even more critical that they are well prepared. 'Coming to faith later, as an adult, I had not developed good biblical foundations, and also being quite transient in my adult life—possibly another pioneer trait—I had not ever really settled into a specific church denomination,' explains pioneering ordinand Tracey Hallett. Tracey spent six years working with young people in their context, and she says, 'we accidentally developed a fresh expressions church. It was through my training as a pioneer youth and community worker that God attached me to the Church of England, and I came to Trinity because I wanted to get a good foundation in theology and biblical studies. As such, I'd like to encourage others in the same position in saying that this is the place to be if you want to develop good solid theological and biblical roots.' Tracey hopes the new pioneering focus will continue to evolve in the ways in which it can offer support and development for pioneering students, and looks forward to the role that this first cohort might be able to play in shaping the group for future students.

Looking for sparks, building bridges

As pioneering ordinands connect to share ideas, hear from practitioners, and think together through pioneer-specific applications of what they are learning in the classroom, they can discover not only how to become stronger bridges for those outside the church but also build bridges of support for one another. They can be better equipped to help build God's kingdom faithfully, to the best of their abilities, with the leap of faith always required in new and unexplored contexts. Sonya Newton has just begun to connect with another estate where her diocese hopes for her to begin a new ministry. 'The feeling that you're called to something you've never seen—it takes a lot of struggling to figure it out. For now, I'm wandering around the estate, making friends and looking for those little lights. That's what pioneers do—they start fires. They look for the sparks, for those little lights around them that say that's what God's is doing—go there, go to them.'   If you are considering theological education and are wondering if this programme could benefit your preparation for ministry, please contact our admissions office: admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254.

Blog

Information for Needs Assessors

The following information is provided for Needs Assessors when drawing up reports for students applying for DSA. For information about Trinity College courses, please click here. Trinity offers an in-house one-to-one study skills support tutor, Mel Lucas. Where it is not possible to provide support in-house, arrangements are made with external suppliers, for example, with BSL interpreters for deaf students. Trinity College does not provide in-house training for assistive technology. Please contact Mel Lucas if you require any further information on 0117 968 0206 or email mel.lucas@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.   NMH Rates 2020 - 2021 >

Life in Carter

While many of our students live in homes and flats in the various neighbourhoods of Bristol, in an average year, our Carter building hosts a close-knit community of around thirty single and commuter students. You can read more here about life in Carter from our student Carter Reps.

Why Trinity?

https://youtu.be/E_x1QcOPRN0

Whether you are in the midst of a discernment process in the Church of England, or from another church background considering how you might best prepare to lead a church or ministry, with all the options before you, why should you consider Trinity?

Within our community, we seek to provide an integrated educational experience. As you learn from the Bible and interact with our faculty, as you engage in church and other placements alongside fellow students and a mentoring church leader, as you practise spiritual disciplines together with the rest of the community—you will grow as a whole person seeking to follow Jesus and bear witness to his coming kingdom as a missional leader. We will not prioritise your academic experience over your context learning, or your context learning over your lectures. We blend challenging study and context experiences together for holistic growth.

What we gain by studying in community together is a deeper engagement in every area. Lecture discussions spill out into coffee times. Your tutors aren’t only in your lectures but are eating lunch with you, meeting in smaller groups with you, as well as regularly available for appointments. The students in your tutor group will serve alongside you in context church placements, and you'll discuss your questions, ideas, and experiences. We spend enough time together to become more like family than fellow students and to practice living Christ’s Beatitudes together. We learn together how to discuss ideas with respect despite disagreement, how to offer confession and forgiveness to one another when needed, how to grow in unity and our ability to love as Christ loves. When you have moments of struggling or feeling discouraged, our community of tutors, students, as well as our chaplains and staff will be there to offer support for you and your family. We are on this journey together at Trinity—and what we build here with one another is carried on after college as a supportive network of relationships.

At Trinity you also gain faculty and staff members who invest in each student individually. We will look at your background and situation and take time to consider the ways in which your time at Trinity could be best constructed to help you grow as a Christian leader. In discussion with you, we will connect you with a context church experience designed to stretch you. We will make sure your classes fit with what you most need to learn academically. If you are pregnant or have recently had a baby, we will work with you around due dates and to figure out with you how to train while juggling the baby’s feedings and care.

Taking the step to move in order to train can feel daunting at moments, but if God is calling you to take that step of faith, he will also provide you and your family with what you need to follow him.

Read our prospectus >

Watch our video >

 

Learning ministry in Bristol

Through community and church placements, as well as volunteer work, our students find a wealth of opportunities to grow as ministers of Christ in the Bristol area.

Community placements

‘I’ve never really had anything to do with hospitals, but as a vicar I’m guaranteed to be responding to people dealing with sickness and death,’ says first-year ordinand Holly Smith, who completed an intensive community placement experience in February among chaplains in Southmead Hospital in Bristol. ‘I’ve only had personal family experience with hospitals, and I know it will be different when it’s not with my own family. I’m a bit scared of hospitals, too, so I wanted to get over that.’

In addition to their ongoing church placement experiences, all of Trinity’s ordinands are required to complete a 20- to 30-hour ‘community placement’ during the first year of their programmes. Ordinands receive a list of about twenty-five organisations with which Trinity is connected, and they can select from among the choices or pursue something different.

‘These experiences help students grow in their own self-understanding, integrate their theology with the practice of ministry and theological reflection, and grow in appreciation for the contributions made by secular organisations,’ says Trinity Tutor in Pastoral Studies and Ministerial Formation Revd Dr Helen Collins. ‘In many cases our students will experience situations that are new and challenging for them.’

Holly began her week at hospital shadowing the chaplaincy team. She toured a morgue, hearing from the woman who works there about how she copes around death. In the second half of Holly’s week, she and the two other Trinity students on placement there were given lists of patients to visit. ‘It felt quite vulnerable…daunting,’ says Holly. ‘I went in scared about what I’d say, but actually they just needed someone to listen. I felt privileged to hear what they had to say. My biggest takeaway from the experience was that pastoral care isn’t about you. You are meeting people in suffering. You need to be secure in yourself so that you can be what they need. And then, when it’s not about you, how do you cope with what you’ve seen and experienced? The chaplains were always reflecting together on what they’d seen to share that burden and make sure they left it there at the end of the day. The chaplains are there for people in life-and-death situations. I learned a lot from them.’

First-year ordinand Elliot Grove connected with his community placement through his context church, Christchurch Clevedon. The national organisation Transforming Lives for Good (TLG) operates one of its centres through the church. This Christian charity works with partner churches across the nation to reach out to the most vulnerable children in the UK, with expertise in school exclusions, emotional well-being, and holiday hunger.

Last November, Elliot began spending an hour a week with a Year 4 child—forty minutes of fun activities and twenty minutes of coaching on behavioural skills, coping with anger, and developing empathy. ‘TLG’s coaching programme—volunteering to give time and invest in a person who needs it—is a powerful thing. I really love doing it, seeing how he and his parents value the sessions.’ Elliot participated in a training day before becoming involved and has regular meetings with his community placement supervisor about his work.

Elliot was training as a teacher when he realised that it wasn’t the right fit and switched to youth ministry. He's enjoyed volunteering when he can to mentor and tutor children struggling at school. But this experience has the added benefit of the model his context church has provided through its involvement in its surrounding community in partnership with organisations like TLG.

‘This is about reaching out compassionately to your community as the church. Christchurch Clevedon do so much in the community, and this is part of how I consider parish ministry. It’s an opportunity to offer yourself out to your community, to minister to the whole community—it isn’t just within the walls of the church.’

The church and social justice

Ordinand and PhD student Sam Rylands moved his church placement to Bristol Cathedral in his second year at Trinity so he could work with the Revd Canon Martin Gainsborough and the cathedral’s Social Justice Group, with its focus on homelessness.

‘There are people sleeping in the doorways of the cathedral. The group wanted to do something and began with a focus on listening and learning, to familiarise themselves on the issues of homelessness. They go out in pairs after Morning Prayer on Fridays and loop round the local area. They offer a hot drink if people are sleeping rough and ask about their housing needs.’ The Friday morning outreach visits have become part of the cathedral’s life of prayer. ‘After the walk we write the prayers of the people we’ve met; the prayers go into a basket and are prayed for in the morning and evening prayers at the cathedral.’

As Martin shifted roles to become chaplain to the Bishop of Bristol, Sam led the cathedral’s involvement in the Bristol Churches Winter Night Shelter (BCWNS), which ran for three months through the winter. Sixty churches from a variety of denominations across Bristol rotated in offering a hot evening meal, a bed, and breakfast for twelve homeless guests. The cathedral hosted the shelter from Monday evenings to Tuesday mornings for the second six-week phase, operating with forty volunteers from within and outside the church, of varying faiths or none.

‘With this arrangement among the churches, the guests know they’ll have a safe place to stay and food to eat for three months. It gives stability,' says Sam. 'Several of the guests were holding down jobs while homeless. Participating in BCWNS was a chance for the cathedral to embody God’s love to some of the most vulnerable in our city.’

The Friday morning conversations with those living rough and time spent as an overnight volunteer in the night shelter impacted Sam as he prepares to begin curacy. ‘It’s tough. Homelessness isn’t an issue where you can change a life overnight. You can’t necessarily see an immediate impact. I’ve found it helpful to remember Jesus’ vision of the Kingdom of God. Namely that it’s the small things that make a big difference. Like yeast, salt, and light, the church is called to participate with God in the midst of the world, bit by bit, slowly transforming and changing the flavour of the society around it.’

Volunteering in a prison

Third-year ordinand Caz M was on a weekend retreat with her sending church, reading the story of the feeding of the five thousand and the twelve baskets that were left over, when she felt God telling her he wanted her to work with the 'leftover' people of society, those on the margins, for whom the idea of God’s love might be alien. With friends, Caz began regularly visiting a worship service at a prison in London and says, ‘I felt the presence of God in that place, like nothing I ever experienced before. When we sang together, everyone was worshipping and singing at full volume; it was inspiring.’ Back at college, she began volunteering to help the prison chaplains in North Bristol.

‘I help out at the family open days,' Caz explains. 'Not all the guys detained there can still see their families, but for those who do, three to four times a year the prison hosts an open day run by the chaplaincy team. The men interact with their families, and they get to be just “Dad” again, not “prisoner number…”.  We facilitate craft activities, face painting, dressing up, and usually someone gives a presentation. I’ve been in the prison visitors’ hall with magicians juggling clubs right up to the ceilings, and on other occasions saw the exotic animal sanctuary team bringing unusual wildlife in through prison security. It's surreal! But it’s great fun and the guys appreciate our volunteering to make the day memorable for their children; it is so important to keep that connection with their families outside.’

Leading Bible studies and helping with a confirmation course at the prison pushed Caz to want to get as much as she can from her classes at Trinity. 'This has challenged me to consider what I actually believe when preparing to teach others and given me an appetite to learn more about the Bible and theology. This is so I can apply it practically through sharing that knowledge with the people I meet and do so in creative ways to help them grasp it for themselves,’ she says.

As Caz moves on to curacy, she plans to continue toward becoming a prison chaplain. ‘Many people in the prison system have been passed on their whole lives. I don’t want to pass them on, but instead help them encounter God and tell them about moving forward with him.’

Posted May 2020

QAA Report

Our most recent Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) review report is available in full through this link. [gallery columns="2" size="full" link="file" ids="8673"]   Our Higher Education Review Action Plan from 2016 is available here >

Student Transfer Arrangements

Information is given here for students who are considering transferring programmes in any one of four distinct circumstances:
  1. Transfer to Trinity College from another institution
  2. Transfer to Trinity College from another theological college operating within Common Awards
  3. Transfer within Trinity College from one programme to another
  4. Transfer from Trinity College to another institution
In each of these circumstances the college has set procedures to facilitate the students' smooth transfer. For policy regarding fee refunds and compensation for discontinuation of study, please refer to the Student Protection Plan. 1.  Transfer to Trinity College from another institution Those wishing to apply to Trinity from another institution should refer to our admissions policy and procedures where you will find general information about what you need to know to apply and be admitted to the college. You will also find more specific information about what to do if you have already acquired skills and knowledge that would be duplicated in your intended programme at Trinity and if and how this can be taken into account through the accreditation of prior learning (APL). The maximum credit for APL which can be offered is normally one-third of the standard programme. You will also find links to the governing regulations through the Common Awards Scheme with Durham University under which we operate for all undergraduate awards. Transfers of supervision from a postgraduate research programme at another institution can only be considered where at least two-thirds of the programme will be undertaken at Trinity College. 2.  Transfer to Trinity College from another theological college operating under the Common Awards Scheme Certain theological education institutions (TEIs) operate under a scheme known as Common Awards, which has been set up under an agreement between the Church of England and Durham University. The participant TEIs can be found listed on the Common Awards website at www.dur.ac.uk/common.awards/teis/. The TEIs offer study opportunities to students wishing to study theology within confessional settings. The scheme is designed to facilitate transfer between participating institutions. Should you be interested in such a transfer you should speak to the academic registrar who will consult with the academic dean to ensure that compatibility between the Trinity programme and that offered in the other TEI can be assured. The normal one-third maximum credit for APL does not apply in such cases. 3.  Transfer within Trinity College from one programme to another In that Trinity College is a single discipline institution offering undergraduate programmes in Theology, Ministry and Mission, there is not the opportunity to change programmes to another discipline. However, there is both opportunity to follow a number of different pathways through the programmes and to move from one programme to another within the general discipline. The extent of choice of pathway will depend on your planned outcomes and that of your sponsor, where applicable, and this should be discussed in the first instance with your personal tutor or the programme leader. If you wish to change your module choice after registration on the module, you should seek advice from the academic registrar as soon as possible. The opportunity to move from one programme to another, for example from the BA programme to the MA programme, will be determined according to the programme regulations and you should discuss these in the first instance with the academic registrar who will seek advice, as needed, from the programme leader or academic dean. Where a move to a higher degree programme is permitted, an early exit qualification may be awarded. 4.  Transfer from Trinity College to another institution If you wish to transfer from Trinity to another institution within Common Awards or outside Common Awards, you should discuss this in the first instance with your personal tutor or with the academic registrar. Advice will be taken as appropriate from the academic dean. The college will provide an academic reference, where required. Where the transfer to another institution involves early exit from a programme, early exit qualifications may be awarded or statements of credit issued. In such cases you should speak in the first instance to the academic registrar. Transfer of research programmes to another institution will be subject to the arrangements of that institution. Advice should be sought from the postgraduate research office.

Flexible training options

Did you know that we are the only theological college to offer our students every mode of training? Trinity students can now choose from three pathways to ordination: full-time residential training, full-time context-based training, and part-time training. Our residential students live in the Bristol neighbourhoods surrounding Trinity, where they are assigned, alongside the other members of their Tutor Group, to a local church in which to gain reflective practical experience and mentoring. Our non-residential students, who have chosen to continue in their current church or ministry context, will continue to minister and be mentored there, while attending one-day-a-week classes and special weekend or summer modules at Trinity. We work to fit our students’ training to their unique situations. We are committed to coming alongside each one to understand their needs and particular calling, to help prepare them to serve God faithfully and to live the values of Christ’s coming kingdom. To talk further about your options, call or email our admissions team: admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254.

Visit

 

Options during the coronavirus pandemic

We hold open days throughout the year   admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk 

Our admissions officer can also give you access to a series of videos we created during last spring's lockdown, with information about Trinity's vision, programme options, modes of study, placement opportunities, and what your week might look like as a Trinity student. Our students who spent the spring lockdown together in our on-site accommodation also created their own video tour of the college

When we fully reopen you will also have the option to schedule an individual visit to college by emailing admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or phoning 0117 968 0254. We will normally try to schedule interviews for you with faculty members during Open Days and individual visits. These help us get to know more about your situation and calling and provide tailored advice regarding which programmes or pathways might best suit your needs.

Questions about part-time study at Trinity? Email jo.norman@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk / Questions about postgraduate research at Trinity? Email pav.slugenova@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk

For more information

Our prospectus can help you get to know us better. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube to keep connected. Our blog will allow you to engage with some of the ideas and viewpoints of our faculty, alumni, students, and friends.

How to get to Trinity

For directions to travel to Trinity, please click here.

 

Apply

  • Click here to apply.
  • If you are a prospective research student, please use the application form for research students.
  • If you are an ordinand who wishes to pursue a research programme, please fill in both forms and submit your research application by either 1 Oct or 15 January to allow your application to be reviewed in time by the Church of England's Research Degree Panel.
  • On completion of the form we can be in touch about booking an interview, so we can talk with you about your spiritual journey, your education and work experiences, and your sense of God's calling. This helps both you and us to discern if Trinity is the place God wants you to be.

 


 

Read Our Admissions Policy and Procedures >

Access and Participation Statement >

Student Protection Plan >

 

 

Diploma

The Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes two years to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. Most Trinity students are over the age of 21; however, if you're a school leaver who is interested in studying with us then just get in touch with our admissions team who will talk with you about your options. Although most candidates will need to have at least two A levels, or equivalent, greater weight is placed on references, interviews and other evidence of motivation and academic ability. International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 6.5 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years. The Diploma is assessed at Levels 4 and 5 and you’re required to take enough modules to add up to 240 credits (120 credits in each year of study). Take a look at our sample module list for an idea of the topics with which you may engage. This programme is available both to our gathered learning community in Bristol (who meet throughout the week for classes) and to our dispersed learners (who come to college in block weeks for classes).   Teaching, learning, and support > What assessment methods does Trinity use in this programme? > What are Trinity's fees? > What happens after your programme? >   Back to residential ordination training info / Back to independent study info / Back to dispersed learning info  

Learning to Disagree: Gender and Sexuality

Last winter, Trinity students participated in a plenary week that brought together speakers with a variety of perspectives on the issues surrounding gender and sexuality to address our students, who themselves hold a variety of perspectives. As the week unfolded, our students responded by providing both those invited to college and one another with the space to have honest conversations, loving one another by listening with respect and humility, while maintaining a simultaneous concern for biblical faithfulness. Ordinand Helen O’Sullivan writes about her experience during the week. [gallery columns="2" link="file" size="full" ids="5442"]  

In February, as a college, we had the opportunity to engage with and reflect on the ethical and pastoral issues for the church today concerning the areas of gender and sexuality. The week was thoughtfully planned and led by our theology and ethics tutor, Rev Dr Jon Coutts, and all students were able to engage in some or all of the week’s activities. I was fortunate enough to be able to assist with the week alongside a group of other students, supporting logistical and technical aspects of the week, as well as welcoming guest speakers. Learning, discussion, and reflection took place in large-scale lectures, pastoral groups, and presentations by visiting speakers.

There were many threads and challenges that arose across the week, and this reflection does not have the capacity to do more than scratch the surface of these. But for me, the themes of inclusivity and integrity were central to our discussions—that as a Church we are called to be inclusive and welcoming, and that we have a mandate to live with integrity and to be biblically faithful as the body of Christ, the first fruits of the new Kingdom. But what do we do when an ethical issue creates a feeling of tension between these two callings for some but not others within the Church?

I was reminded that none of the individual issues we might discuss exist in a vacuum. They are shaped and mediated for us by other factors before we even begin to discuss them. For a start they sit within a much broader biblical framework, which can support, challenge, and give structure to conversations, and they are also located within the cultural norms of our societies. We cannot engage in any of these discussions except out of our own experiences and understanding, and so we must always acknowledge that we will only come with part of the jigsaw, and that in order to begin to wrestle with the bigger picture we are reliant on others to share their stories, experiences and positions. With the challenges of the social media bubblewhere I have found myself following and sharing stories with those who generally think the same way as I do, and churchestendencies to gather in like-minded tribes where we can feel comfortable and at home, it is easy to find ourselves hearing only one side of a story. This week reminded me that, as with any issue, it is vital that we make room for the voices of those for whom these issues are not simply theological points to be debated, or church policy to be developed, but for whom the issues are personal and part of their everyday lives.

During the plenary week we had the opportunity to hear from a range of different speakers with a variety of experiences and positions on issues of gender and sexuality. Their honesty, vulnerability, and humility meant we were able to engage with the choices they have personally made in light of their own biblical reflection and circumstances. Their stories helped me to reflect on the fact that everyone has a contribution to make to conversations in these areas; however, everyone also has to take responsibility for the position they hold, for doing the hard work of theological and pastoral reflection. We need to use every hermeneutical and reflective tool at our disposal if we are to discuss these issues robustly. I was challenged to realise that if I don't do this work, I am in danger of either resorting to platitudes or proof texts or worse—lapsing into an uncomfortable silence of indecision.

Elaine Sommers, a transgender person who came to speak to us, highlighted this for me by reflecting on her own perception and experience of hearing issues of gender and sexuality spoken about in churches. Her main reflection was that, despite the ongoing debates at national and international levels, she has found an almost deafening silence in local churches around these issues. And yet it is in local churches where congregations need to be equipped to ask, What is the faithful thing to do in this time and place?How do those of us who lead, preach, and disciple in our churches ensure that, no matter what views we hold, we speak about them constructively? This week has helped me to develop my understanding that to be able to speak constructively about divisive issues we need to be able to share the same starting points—robust theological work and engaged pastoral reflection—enabling a shared conversation with integrity and inclusivity. I was left with the challenge that both integrity and inclusivity are vital to the identity of the church as the body of Christ and the mission of God. While as the Church our witness to the world is to be shown in our love, this cannot justify avoiding taking a stand on ethical issues. However, we must also recognise that debates on ethical issues are by their very nature integral to peoples lives and will be received in relational terms. Inclusivity and integrity can only have meaning when enacted in a community rooted in a given time and place. They become a reality in the way we relate to God, the way we relate to the people around us, and how these two sets of relationships interact. In seeking to live out inclusivity and integrity in our locations, we need to speak about how to discuss and make choices with biblical faithfulness and humility. For me this week was not so much about answers to a specific issue as about developing a robust and sensitive approach to issues that might ignite division in a church. While it was both interesting and helpful to engage with the area of gender and sexual ethics, for me, my main learning was around how the church can better engage in general with challenging ethical issues. Looking to the future, as a church leader, I will have other divisive challenges to face and will need to have the skills and attitudes that will enable me to be responsible for my own opinions and to be willing to be vulnerable and humble enough to listen well to others and to Gods word. Finally, it was so encouraging that the week's conversations were framed in an attitude of respect and generosity, and as a community there was a desire for different views to be heard and considered. The vision was for a safe space where people could share their views as well as have the courage to try out new thoughts or changing ideas as the week progressed, which was visible in people's engagement in discussions, the questions they asked, and the grace with which disagreements were handled. Our existing relationships as a college community enabled courage and vulnerability to lie at the heart of disagreements rather than a desire to win an argument. For me, this showed the strength of holding these conversations in a community where relationships are built around a vision of the Kingdom as a people united in Christ.   [gallery size="full" ids="4263"] Helen O’Sullivan is an ordinand from Winchester Diocese pursuing a Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission.   (Reprinted from the Spring 2017 Trinity News)

Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

The Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes three years to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. Most Trinity students are over the age of 21; however, if you're a school leaver who is interested in studying with us then just get in touch with our admissions team who will talk with you about your options. Although most candidates will need to have at least three A levels, or equivalent, greater weight is placed on references, interviews and other evidence of motivation and academic ability. International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 6.5 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years. The BA (Hons) is assessed at Levels 4, 5 and 6 and you’re required to take enough modules to add up to 360 credits (120 credits in each year of study). Take a look at our sample module list for an idea of the topics with which you may engage. This programme is available both to our gathered learning community in Bristol (who meet throughout the week for classes) and to our dispersed learners (who come to college in block weeks for classes).   Teaching, learning, and support > What assessment methods does Trinity use in this programme? > What are Trinity's fees? > What happens after your programme? >   Back to residential ordination training info / Back to independent study info / Back to dispersed learning info  

Visit Trinity

 

Full-time Students

If you are a prospective full-time student who would like to visit us, we would love to host you for an Open Day, or to schedule a visit on a different day. Just email our admissions team to arrange a time to tour the college, experience student life here, and book an interview.

Part-time Students

If you are a prospective part-time student who wants to find out more about the part-time courses, please contact our part-time admissions team or call 0117 968 0253 for more information.

For More Information

Our prospectus will give you a good sense of who we are and what we do. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter or Instagram to find out more about events and happenings around the college as well as in the lives of our larger community. Our blog will allow you to engage with some of the ideas and viewpoints of our faculty, alumni, students, and friends.

Assessment Methods

Overview

The purpose of assessments is to ensure that you have achieved the learning outcomes of the module. While the teaching takes place in the classroom, your learning will also take place in preparatory reading or other activities for classes, the reading and thinking that is involved in the writing of your assessment, the feedback from a marked piece of work, in informal conversation and discussion with other students and with faculty. Students can usually choose an essay or other assessment task from a range of options that will be given to the class at the beginning of the module. The length of the essay will be specified in terms of a word count and assignments will have an indicative reading list. In many cases the assessment takes the form of an essay. However, some modules require other forms of assessment that allow for greater creativity, different learning styles and, above all, which ensure that you make connections between the learning of the module and practical experience and ministry. Examples of other kinds of assessment might include:
  • a response to a case study
  • a learning journal
  • a sermon
  • a theological reflection on a critical incident
  • a group presentation for a specific context
  • preparing a liturgy for a special occasion
  • a book review
  • writing an imaginary dialogue of a pastoral situation
  • lay training programme for developing skills in pastoral care among church members
  • a portfolio

Guidelines

General guidelines for the different types of assessment can be found on Moodle or on the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/assessment/guidelines. If you are not sure, do not hesitate to ask for clarification from the module tutor. In general, however, tutors do not read outlines or drafts of essays. The amount of time that you spend completing an assessment is directly proportional to the credit-weighting of the module: an assignment for a 20-credit module should take twice as long to prepare as an assignment for a 10-credit module. Some modules require more than one assignment, or are assessed by examination.

Assessment Criteria

The most important aspect of an assessment is the learning that you have done in completing it, not the mark that you receive! It is good to remember that the purpose of your assignment is to demonstrate to yourself and to the reader that you have a good grasp of the subject matter and a clear and persuasive answer to the question posed by the title or task. Students should familiarise themselves with the detailed marking criteria which are available on Moodle and on the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/assessment/criteria. Students must make sure that assignments follow the conventions stated in the Style Guide found on Moodle. You will receive more detailed assessment information through our Student Handbook when you begin your studies at Trinity. Return to Diploma page > Return to BA page > Return to Graduate Diploma page > Return to Postgraduate Diploma page > Return to MA page >

Dev pages

Word Lengths

In writing to a prescribed brief and set length, the arts of rigour and concision are developed. These are valuable transferable skills. Details of the required word length for each assignment can be found in the module delivery guide. It is the student's responsibility to make sure they meet the requirements regarding word length. Policy on over-length work:
  • Students must declare an exact word count when submitting written assessments. Deliberately misrepresenting the length of an assessment will be treated as an act of dishonesty and will be noted as a disciplinary offence on the student’s record.
  • There are no penalties for under-length work. Work that is significantly under-length is likely to be self-penalising.
  • The penalties for over-length work specified below apply to all assessments for which there is a word limit, including postgraduate dissertations.
  • For assessments with a word limit of 1000 words or more there is a grace interval of 100 words. Students will not be penalised for exceeding the stated word count by 100 words. If a student exceeds the word limit by more than 100 words, the grace interval should be subtracted from the total word count before calculating the penalty to be applied (see 8).
  • For assessments with a word limit of less than 1000 words there is no grace interval. In these cases any piece of work which exceeds the word count should be subject to the penalties set out below.
  • The penalties for over-length work are as follows:

Up to 10% over-length: Deduction of 10 percentage points from the mark.

11-20% over-length: Deduction of 20 percentage points from the mark.

21-50% over-length: Mark will be capped at pass level (40% at Levels 4-6; 50% at Level 7).

More than 50% over-length: A mark of zero will be given.

  • In cases where the work is 50% over-length or less, if the application of a penalty for exceeding the word limit would reduce the mark of an assignment which would otherwise pass to a mark below pass level, then the mark for the assignment should instead be capped at pass level.
  • The above penalties are calculated after subtracting the grace interval (where this applies) if the student has exceeded the word count by more than 100 words. For example, in the case of an assessment with a word limit of 1000 words, a piece of work which is 100 words over the limit should receive no penalty because it is within the grace interval, but for pieces of work between 101 and 200 words over-length 10 percentage points should be deducted from the mark (1,101-1,200 minus the 100 word grace interval is equivalent to 1001-1100 words, i.e. up to 10% over-length).
9. The table below gives further examples of penalties to be applied:   10. The word limit on assessments includes all the main text including sub-headings, tables, and all referencing. 11. The word limit excludes the essay title, bibliography, graphs and images, and declarations. The word limit also excludes appendices. Appendices should only contain supporting material relevant to the main body of the assessed work and must not contain any additional analysis or argument. Further information can be found in the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/assessment.

Programmes of study at Trinity

Trinity is a community of people studying theology for different reasons, but we all have one thing in common -- a desire to live meaningful, missional kingdom lives wherever God might call us.

Explore our full-time programmes >

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Explore our postgraduate research programme >

 

Library and study information

Learn about the library, our fees, our disability support, and other study information >

 

 

Learn more about ordination training >  /  Learn more about independent study

Extension requests and extenuating circumstances

  Extensions to deadlines may be requested in cases of illness or other extenuating circumstances. Such requests must normally be made at least one week before the deadline: students must complete an extension request form (available on Moodle or from the APT Office) which needs to be signed by their personal tutor and by the Academic Registrar or Director of Studies. Extension requests are not granted automatically. A doctor's note may be required (see 'extenuating circumstances' below). It is not normally possible to grant extensions beyond the final deadline of the academic year. Students who receive academic support from Mel Lucas are normally allowed a two week extension to the set deadlines, except for the final end of year deadline. If ongoing medical problems or acute personal circumstances affect your work, you should always discuss this with your tutor in the first instance and as soon as possible. Your tutor will often be able to offer advice on managing your workload, on possible sources of help and on the options open to you if things do not improve. He/she will also ensure that your difficulties are taken into account when considering issues such as absences from class, extension requests, performance in assessment, etc. Boards of Examiners do take medical and personal circumstances into account when considering the progress of students or degree classification, provided that they have been informed of them (with supporting evidence) in advance. Any such circumstances which could have been raised before the meeting, but which, without valid reason, were not raised, will not be considered in the event of an appeal. Further information is available on the following link: dur.ac.uk/common.awards/policies/illness.

Deadlines and assignment submissions

Academic Deadlines

The ability to complete a piece of academic work in a prescribed amount of time is part and parcel of the assessment process. All assignments have firm deadlines. The full list of submission dates is available on Moodle and on the noticeboard outside the lecture rooms. We recognise that some terms will inevitably have heavier workloads than others and that often you will be juggling community responsibilities as well as practical placements or context work with your studies. However, one of the skills that you will develop during your time at College is to organise and manage your workload. This means setting your priorities in such a way as to meet deadlines successfully and learning to cope with the inevitable fluctuations in work pressure.

Submitting Assignments

You may submit your assignments as soon as they are finished, even if it is before the deadline. Assignments must be submitted via Turnitin using Moodle 2 by midnight on the deadline date (with the exception of modules assessed by a portfolio, which must be submitted by hard copy only). Markers aim to complete marking within five weeks of the deadline wherever possible. This will enable you to respond to feedback in subsequent assignments and so to progress through the year. If this is not possible, for example, through illness, you will be notified as soon as possible of the revised return date. Marking of your first assignment will be fast tracked if possible. From September 2016, we are planning to introduce online marking for most modules. In a few cases, it will be necessary to hand in hard copies as well as electronic submission. Students will be advised of the modules where this is necessary. In such cases, hard copies must be handed in to the Academic and Practical Training (APT) Office by 9:00 am on the day following the deadline date (whereas electronic submission is by 11:59pm on deadline day). A cover sheet is needed for each assignment. These are available to download from Moodle or from the APT Office.

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TrinityFest

Trinity Fest is a two-day festival for the college community to come and let their hair down after a tough and isolated year. There will be a chance to stay overnight on site, in tents, or in a rented room (at additional cost). Friday is exclusively aimed at adults whilst Saturday is aimed at the whole family. Saturday will be a family-friendly all welcome day. More details to follow (but we're really excited!!!)    

Teaching, learning, and support

At Trinity, you will learn through a combination of

  • Classroom lectures (through term time and block weeks)
  • Smaller seminars or discussion groups
  • School of Leadership lectures and discussions
  • Your own time spent reading, studying, and in the completion of required tasks
  • Experiential learning through church placements
  • Experiential learning through community placements
  • Interaction with tutors and fellow students through pastoral groups and in other settings
  • Outside speakers invited to college to preach, teach, and participate in special events and workshops.

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Student Feedback Processes

We greatly value feedback from the student body, and various mechanisms are in place to analyse the quality and delivery of the modules offered at all levels. All students complete an online questionnaire at the end of each module; students may also make any comments on individual modules directly to the member of the Student Executive responsible for Learning. We also ask for student feedback on the programme as a whole at the end of each year.

Extra Support and Help

To enable all students to reach their potential, we provide learning support throughout your time at Trinity. All students on undergraduate and taught postgraduate programmes are allocated a pastoral group tutor who is available to give support and advice if needed, in addition to weekly tutor group meetings. We also have three chaplains on staff, who are available to be a listening ear and to pray with you about any needs or concerns.

Some of our students have been out of education for a number of years, or have not studied at degree level before. All undergraduate students attend study skills sessions at the start of their programme, and further one-to-one support is also available.

Students who have been assessed as having specific learning or other needs may access further support if this is needed. Read more about our learning and disability support here.

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You can use this link to update your email and/or postal address, manage which publications you'd like to receive from Trinity, or unsubscribe from our news.

Student and Family Support

We want you to grow and flourish during your time at Trinity. Below are some of the ways in which our students can develop networks of support, many of which will outlast your time in our community.

What happens after your programme?

The majority of our students are preparing for ordination. Toward the end of your programme, we will provide you with plenty of practical information about finding a curacy that is the right fit for you and your family. We will help you think carefully through the process, as well as providing helpful information regarding how the process works.

Other members of our community have used their education to serve in leadership roles within churches, Christian ministries, and other nonprofit organisations. Or you might choose to remain in your current workplace and use your education to enrich your daily life.

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Graduate Diploma

The Graduate Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes one year to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. This programme is most suitable for someone who has completed either a diploma or foundation degree in theology and is looking to progress towards the MA. We only offer the Graduate Diploma to students who have completed 240 credits of theology elsewhere. International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 6.5 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years. The GradDip is assessed at Levels 5 and 6 and you’re required to take enough modules to add up to 120 credits. Take a look at our sample module list for an idea of the topics with which you may engage.   Teaching, learning, and support > What assessment methods does Trinity use in this programme? > What are Trinity's fees? > What happens after your programme? >   Back to ordination training info / Back to independent study info   

Postgraduate Diploma

The Postgraduate Diploma in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes one year to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. To qualify for entry to the PGDip you need: > a first-class or upper-second degree in theology or a closely related discipline or > a Graduate Diploma in Theology or > a first-class or upper-second degree in a non-theological discipline plus a Certificate in Theology with an overall average of at least 60% International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 7 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years. The PGDip is assessed at Levels 6 and 7 and you’re required to take enough modules to add up to 120 credits. (If you only complete 60 credits then you can still leave with a Postgraduate Certificate). Take a look at our sample module list for an idea of the topics with which you may engage.   Teaching, learning, and support > What assessment methods does Trinity use in this programme? > What are Trinity's fees? > What happens after your programme? >   Back to ordination training info / Back to independent study info

MA

The Master of Arts in Theology, Ministry and Mission takes one year to complete when studied full time and is accredited by Durham University. To qualify for entry to the MA you need: > a first-class or upper-second degree in theology or a closely related discipline or > a Graduate Diploma in Theology or > a first-class or upper-second degree in a non-theological discipline plus a Certificate in Theology with an overall average of at least 60% International students need to have an IELTS (International English Language Test Score) of 7 and the English language test must have been taken within the last two years. The MA is assessed at Levels 6 and 7 and you’re required to gain 180 credits: 120 through taught modules and 60 through a 15,000-word dissertation. Take a look at our sample module list for an idea of the topics with which you may engage. If you are a Trinity alumnus/a who would like to continue your studies through Trinity, you can qualify for a 10% discount on this programme.   View the MA modules offered in 2020-2021 >   Teaching, learning, and support > What assessment methods does Trinity use in this programme? > What are Trinity's fees? > What happens after your programme? >   Back to ordination training info / Back to independent studies info / Back to the alumni hub

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Give to Trinity

During your time at Trinity you will have benefitted from the generosity of many alumni and friends who have given faithfully over the years to help fund the kingdom work of the college.

When you give to Trinity, you help us continue in our mission to shape leaders of Christ-like character in community for a missional church. You help our independent (non-ordinand) students pay their fees and you provide funds for the development of the college, in areas like ongoing IT improvements, investment in the library and student studies, and our site development projects. We are grateful for your partnership!

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Text UHMK13 to 70070 along with the amount you’d like to donate.

Bursary Fund
If you want your gift to contribute specifically toward helping decrease the cost of student fees, please designate 'bursary fund' when you give. Meet some of the students who have benefited from your gifts to our bursary fund:

Meet Naureen: A voice for women in Pakistan >
Meet Amy: Teaching lay leaders the Bible >
Meet Martha: Pursuing social justice >

Student Village

Trinity College Student Village Development

Building a Christ-centred learning community in the heart of Bristol.

“From the moment I walked in, I felt like I belonged. Community life at Trinity is vibrant and loving and the two years I have spent here have been the most fruitful and enjoyable years of my life.”

Emma, Ordinand

So many Trinity students say that the best thing about studying here is living as part of a Christ-centred, challenging, encouraging community. There’s a special feel to this place; an atmosphere and a Kingdom way of life that’s infectious. We want more future ministers and everybody who visits this place to experience it and take it with them when they go.

That’s why we’re planning new, flexible accommodation on site at Trinity College that will nurture this community for the next 50 years and beyond.

It’s not the same on Zoom!

Trinity life is about more than just lectures – it’s what goes on as we gather at the chapel each morning, share lunch together, or sit around a campfire after dark. There’s a rhythm to life here that forms a deep community.

This is why we welcome our ‘dispersed’ learners who live elsewhere to come and stay for block weeks on campus, rather than just taking a day trip. Our students living out in the city gather here frequently and take this way of life back to the Bristol churches and neighbourhoods they’re part of.

The culture in the campus community sets the tone for everybody’s experience of Trinity College – whether they’re students, conference guests, visitors, local churches or families using our nursery. It’s worth investing in.

“Having the chance to talk about the things I’m learning, especially with friends who may see things differently to me, every day over lunch or coffee or on placement, has been a massive help to me!”

Mike, Trinity student

Flexibility for the future

At the moment, our on-site accommodation (the Carter block) is old, dormitory-style and only suitable for our single students. We welcome students with spouses and children (we even have our own nursery!), but currently they can only live off-site in one of our houses in Bristol.

This has its benefits, and we intend to keep the same arrangement for now, but we want our new housing to be more adaptable; able to meet the college’s needs whatever our student demographic looks like in years to come. The buildings will have a flexible layout, so they could be used by single students, guests, groups or families in the future.

We also need much better accessibility. We plan for our new student village to be accessible by default, including wheelchair access and hearing loops, so that any student can enjoy living in the campus community.

Another thing we’ve been able to do is to offer our accommodation, when it’s standing empty, to people in need in the city. We’ve been working with local partners like Bristol Hospitality Network to house asylum seekers where we can, both off and on site, and have loved welcoming them into this special community.

There is a growing housing crisis in Bristol and our desire is not to buy up more properties to house our students in the city, but to build our own sustainable accommodation that we can share when we have opportunity.

The woodland village

The new student village will be a cluster of buildings surrounded by woodland, with shared spaces for the community to meet. It will be carefully and sympathetically designed so that it blends in with the woodland and trees, and doesn’t overshadow the historic Stoke House. Nearly 40 architects entered our competition to design the development.

We want to use sustainable materials and ensure the new buildings are energy efficient and built to stand the test of time. Our goal is to work with local builders and tradespeople, investing in our wider community.

Our aims align with the vision of Archbishop of Canterbury's Commission on Housing, Church and Community – to 'build better communities and homes, not just houses’. Bristol City Council is also encouraging the building of sustainable, affordable new accommodation, and the project is enthusiastically supported by Bristol Housing Festival.

The next phase…

Once the new student village is complete, we plan to redevelop the old Carter block so that it can accommodate all of our dispersed learners during their block weeks, along with guests and visitors.

The long-term plan is to have enough accommodation on site at Trinity College for everybody to experience and contribute to the “vibrant and loving” community.

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Bristol Housing Festival Archbishop's Commission

Information for vocational and discernment directors

If you work in a Church of England diocese to help guide those considering ordination, we want to supply you with helpful information about what we offer. We usually hold two DDO Days, one in the Autumn term and another in the Spring. Our upcoming DDO Days are on Wednesday 30th November 2022 and Wednesday 8th March 2023 - if you would like to attend either of these please complete the booking form here:  Booking form For more information about these events, please email admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk.

Changes in place for increased safety

We will be open between 8am and 6pm, Monday to Friday, and closed at the weekends. This is because when Trinity is open, we need to have domestic staff working to keep our buildings clean and sanitised. There will be a one-way system for movement around our main building (Stoke House); please follow the signs. Everyone who is able to wear a mask should bring one and be prepared to use it when in public spaces and particularly when moving through the corridors. The standard government guide for physical distancing will apply (2m distance wherever possible and the use of a mask and a minimum of 1m distance where 2m is not possible). There will be hand sanitiser available at several points around Stoke House, but you may wish to bring your own. All toilet facilities will be in use and frequently cleaned and disinfected. There will be a protective Perspex sheet installed at the reception desk.

Certificate in Theology, Ministry and Mission

This programme is validated by Durham University. The certificate is the equivalent of the first year of a three-year degree course; modules are taught at Level 4.

WHO IS IT FOR?

This course is ideal for those wishing to begin studying theology. Those who complete the certificate programme as full-time students will gain the additional benefits of a deeper engagement in the Trinity community.

WHAT IS INVOLVED?

All certificate students complete taught modules totalling 120 credits. Full-time certificate students can choose to join our gathered learning community in Bristol on Tuesday, Thursday, and/or Friday mornings, or to join our dispersed learners, who come to college in block weeks throughout the year for classes. Part-time certificate students can join us for classes on Tuesday nights. Certificate students also participate in an induction week and study skills sessions. Take a look at our sample module list to see some of topics with which you may engage.

WHAT QUALIFICATIONS DO I NEED?

At least one A-level or equivalent. Relevant work experience may be considered. Applicants will need to demonstrate their potential to benefit from study at this level. The certificate provides the ideal foundation to theology and, should you be considering the possibility of studying towards an MA in the long term, it best translates into studying at MA level (as long as the mark obtained in the certificate meets Durham's minimum requirement, and you have a previous degree in any discipline of at least a 2.1).

TIME MANAGEMENT

Full-time study will require about the same amount of work as a full-time job, so you will need to plan your time accordingly.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO ATTEND CLASSES BUT NOT DO THE ASSESSED COURSE?

The teaching is available to those who wish to attend lectures without the pressure of having to write assignments. Students can choose one or two modules that interest them rather than having to do the whole course.

HOW DO I APPLY?

If you are interested in completing the certificate as a full-time student, please contact Alison Branston (admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0254). If you would like to complete the certificate as a part-time student, please contact Jo Norman (jo.norman@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk or 0117 968 0253).  

Why study theology if you aren't becoming a vicar?

Our independent students join the Trinity community to study theology for a wide range of reasons that include:

  • Church leadership outside of the Church of England. We work in partnership with Bristol Baptist College and with local non-denominational churches, and our community includes students and tutors from a mix of backgrounds. 
  • Those who want to teach RE, Bible, or theology at the primary, secondary, or tertiary levels. Some of our current independent students are preparing to teach RE in secondary schools, while others are accessing our postgraduate research MA and PhD options to prepare themselves to teach at university level. [Meet an independent student who will teach lay leaders the Bible.]
  • Lay leadership in the Church of EnglandWe will offer you a robust theological education as you prepare to teach, preach, work with children and youth, and engage in mission through your church. 
  • Mission work. Perhaps God is asking you to serve him somewhere outside the UK, perhaps he is calling you to come alongside those in need within the UK. As you prepare to engage with the practical and spiritual needs of others, a strong theological education will be foundational to all you do.
  • Other! Some of our independent students have goals to become human rights activists, chaplains, or some join us simply out of a desire to gain a deeper understanding of the Bible as followers of Jesus Christ. Time spent gaining a deeper understanding of how to read your Bible and what it means to follow Jesus Christ in today's world will never be wasted. [Meet an independent student who wants to pursue human rights law.] 

About Us

Welcome Week

Welcome Week (12-18 September) for new students will happen with restrictions in place, including limiting the numbers in rooms to enable physical distancing. Larger events will be streamed across more than one room.

Open Days

We host several open days during the year for our different modes of study.

Please get in touch with admissions@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk if you would like to discuss prospective study further.

See the form below for our next open days and open afternoons


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ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES

To help you learn more about us in advance of the Open Day, below are links to a series of short videos we created during last spring's lockdown for prospective students, including a college tour made by a group of our students who spent the lockdown together on-site. 

  1. Learn more about Trinity's vision and values (with Principal Revd Dr Sean Doherty, 15:57 minutes) >
  2. Watch a video about studying within our residential/'gathered' Bristol community (1:56 minutes) >
  3. Watch a video about studying through our non-residential/'dispersed learning' programme (2:30 minutes) >
  4. What academic programmes and context experiences do we offer? (with Revd Dr Helen Collins, 9:13 minutes) >
  5. What will the shape of your week look like as a Trinity student? (with Revd Dr Sean Doherty) >
  6. Take a college tour, hosted by our students who've remained in on-site accommodation together during lockdown (4:55 minutes) >
  7. Load a PDF of the kingdom values to which you commit when you join our community >

 

Lectures

Lectures this year will be a mix of in-class and virtual (delivered online in real time). All in-class lectures will also be available virtually to those who cannot be present in class. Lecture rooms will be arranged to enable physical distancing; where it is not feasible to maintain 2m, students who are able to wear masks will be asked to do so. Class start and end times will be staggered to minimise the number of people moving through the building. 

Tutor groups

 

Tutor groups will continue to meet on Wednesday mornings and pray together on Thursday mornings, with staggered start and finish times. To enable social distancing, groups will meet in larger rooms, rather than in the tutors’ studies. Supervision sessions will continue to take place on Wednesday mornings and will normally be online.

Library use

The library will be open for accessing books, but numbers allowed in will be restricted. The library will not be open to external users. We will be increasing our provision of online resources. Student studies will be allocated this year in a way that enables physical distancing; smaller rooms will have single occupancy.

Worship guidelines

 

Worship will continue to be led from the chapel at 8:30am each weekday morning. To enable physical distancing, only the tutor group leading worship and two other tutor groups will take turns being physically present in the chapel, and the other groups will participate via a live link in the dining room. Worship will also be streamed through the Trinity’s YouTube channel. Current government guidance prohibits congregational singing, but musicians and small groups may sing and play at the front of chapel. Evening prayer will continue to take place daily at 5pm but now in the main chapel with physical distancing.

Meetings with tutors

The majority of tutors and staff will continue to be physically present and accessible, and their availability is an important part of your formation. Some staff, including tutors, will need to work from home for shielding purposes. Student should continue to arrange meetings, in person or online, with tutors for valuable pastoral, theological, and formation discussions. Rather than popping into offices, students should email to arrange a time to meet with a faculty or staff member.

Lunch

We are currently planning to host lunches in the form of a take-away, which can be eaten in various locations around the college. If you want to meet in groups, you will need to meet outdoors if weather permits or to arrange to meet in a room designated for small group use. Coffee breaks will be staggered in accordance with adjustments to the academic and formation timetable to reduce the numbers gathering in one place and moving around the building. We recognise that, given the importance our community places on eating together, this is one of the more difficult changes we need to make this year. We will keep the situation under review and bring back gathering for meals when we can do so safely.

Part-time programme

 

Our Tuesday evening part-time students will be attending lectures virtually, at least until Christmas, with part-time ordinands coming in person for tutor group meetings. Students will be advised about times to access the library.

School of Leadership

The School of Leadership will be moving online to enable our dispersed learners and part-time students to access seminars as well.

If you feel unwell

 

If you display any possible symptoms of COVID-19, do not come in but rather follow public health guidance with respect to self-isolation, book a test, and inform us of the result. Please also do not come to college if you have a cold. If you are unwell and a student, please alert both your tutor group tutor and Sophie Davis (sophie.davis@trinitycollegebristol.ac.uk).

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