Spiritual formation


What lies in our hearts directs our lives. Loving God and being devoted to him is not something that can easily be faked – congregations are rarely fooled.

Leaders who want to ride the rough and the smooth of life and ministry, and still remain devoted to God above all other things, need patterns of prayer and worship which will help sustain them across the years. That’s why we’re so intentional about our disciplines of prayer and worship at Trinity, not only learning more about their histories, forms and purposes but practising them together daily.

As a community we pray our Bible; we pray our theology; we pray our mission and ministry. But, ultimately, we pray because of the amazing presence of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, who meets us when we come before him, giving a point and a purpose to it all.

 

Times of worship

eucharist-croppedWe begin each day with a chance to worship and pray together in our morning chapel services, from 8.30-9am.

This serves as both a sacred act of worship and a formational time of learning: groups of students take it in turn to plan and run the services, so that everyone has a chance across the year to both lead and be led. We also have weekly Communion services, into which a more extended time of teaching is incorporated.

Our services often take the form of Common Worship, but we also make use of other traditions and styles of worship from the simple expressions of the Iona and Taize communities to the weighty liturgy of the Book of Common Prayer. We also have several Creative Weeks, where the innovation of the community is given free reign, and it’s both a privilege and a learning opportunity to be able to worship God in such diverse ways.

Spirituality course

As a whole community we engage with a weekly Spirituality programme, consisting of a 50-minute session on a key topic relating to Christian discipleship followed by an hour of silence, meant for personal contemplation and prayer.

We also have one quiet day every term, each involving different opportunities for personal and corporate reflection, prayer and spiritual growth.

Pastoral groups

Every member of the Trinity community has the opportunity to be in a pastoral group, most of which are made up of 8-10 people.

The groups meet for two hours every Wednesday, dividing their time between worship and prayer, theological reflections, serving the wider community in practical ways and simply socialising and enjoying one another’s company.

As well as these larger groups, the forming of prayer triplets is encouraged throughout the community, so that we’re able to offer one another truly personal support and accountability.

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